Astronomy

Talk about Scientific Discoveries, Theories and the like
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Labbie
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Astronomy

Post by Labbie » Wed Dec 13, 2006 11:13 pm

Geminid meteor shower tonight and tomorrow night, could be a good show, at least until the moon rises.

Geminid Meteor Shower

Dark skies everyone.
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Post by Knightmare » Thu Dec 14, 2006 2:18 am

Figures. It's too cloudy here to see much of anything.
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Post by Labbie » Thu Dec 14, 2006 5:28 am

Yeah, here too. I just went out and looked. I did see one thru the one hole in the clouds. But it's too cold to stay out for very long here too.

Maybe tomorrow will be better.
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Post by Knightmare » Thu Dec 14, 2006 5:34 am

Dude.....hit the flash chat. Me and Enigma are in there now..it's pretty cool.
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Post by Labbie » Thu Dec 14, 2006 2:41 pm

Sorry I missed you guys in the chat. Was just dead tired and went to bed.
:smt015
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Post by Enigma » Fri Dec 15, 2006 2:28 am

Well we know where your priorities are... sleep or team members.

Pillow 1, Team members 0 ----- LOL!!! ;->

You have to checkout the "auto censorship" of flash chat.. its hilarious!!
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Post by Knightmare » Fri Dec 15, 2006 2:31 am

I told him about it on Skype a little while ago....lmao
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Post by Labbie » Sat Jun 14, 2008 12:55 pm

Pluto gets a new name: plutoid
Thu Jun 12, 11:59 AM ET

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Pluto, demoted from planet status in 2006, got a consolation prize on Wednesday -- it and other dwarf planets like it will be called plutoids.

The International Astronomical Union said in a statement that its executive committee meeting in Oslo, Norway, decided on the term.

Plutoids will be defined as celestial bodies in orbit around the Sun farther away than Neptune. They must have near-spherical shape, and must not have swept up other, smaller objects in their orbits, said the organization, which names newly discovered planets and other celestial bodies.

The two known and named plutoids are Pluto and Eris, but astronomers expect to find more.

Another dwarf planet, Ceres, does not merit the plutoid designation because it is in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox)
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Post by Sarge_II » Sat Jun 14, 2008 3:39 pm

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Post by Dark Angel » Sun Jun 15, 2008 7:45 am

Labbie wrote:Pluto gets a new name: plutoid
Thu Jun 12, 11:59 AM ET

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Pluto, demoted from planet status in 2006, got a consolation prize on Wednesday -- it and other dwarf planets like it will be called plutoids.

The International Astronomical Union said in a statement that its executive committee meeting in Oslo, Norway, decided on the term.

Plutoids will be defined as celestial bodies in orbit around the Sun farther away than Neptune. They must have near-spherical shape, and must not have swept up other, smaller objects in their orbits, said the organization, which names newly discovered planets and other celestial bodies.

The two known and named plutoids are Pluto and Eris, but astronomers expect to find more.

Another dwarf planet, Ceres, does not merit the plutoid designation because it is in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

(Reporting by Maggie Fox)
Ya adding insult to stupidity...this international body of nobodies has little to no say in my book...it's just a self appointed bunch of back patting idiots who have nothing better to do with their time then try to re-write history and astronomy in their image...personally pluto is still a planet and I'd give any one of them a ear full if I met them on the street.
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Post by Gavin Shaw » Sun Jun 15, 2008 7:51 am

Technically its a dwarf planet. But its not a planet, but a dwarf planet.

Get me point yet? And why I think there are quite a few idiots there. Pluto not planet, but it is a dwarf planet.

If something is a dwarf planet, isn't it actually still a planet?
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Post by Sarge_II » Sun Jun 15, 2008 2:29 pm

Gavin Shaw wrote:Technically its a dwarf planet. But its not a planet, but a dwarf planet.

Get me point yet? And why I think there are quite a few idiots there. Pluto not planet, but it is a dwarf planet.

If something is a dwarf planet, isn't it actually still a planet?
Dwarf. Definite dwarf.
Horatio, there are more dwarfs and idiots combined in the heavens than can be found in your International Astronomical Union.
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Post by Sparrow » Sun Jun 15, 2008 6:19 pm

Horatio, there are more dwarfs and idiots combined in the heavens than can be found in your International Astronomical Union.
Horatio, I think Sarge II is right. I can understand the heartburn some had over Pluto remaining classified as a planet. But I felt the earth move when the IAU demoted it. I mean, how can 10,000 science fiction stories all be wrong? The foundations of my long-gone youth are shaken!

Now we have planets, dwarf planets, and most recenetly plutoids. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot? Seems pretty arrogant to be creatings new classes of objects when we know so little about what's beyond Neptune, and while having only two examples in hand. And for that matter, why don't we have a classification for binary planets, of which the Earth-Luna pair would be the extant example?
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Post by Knightmare » Sun Jun 15, 2008 8:59 pm

Sparrow wrote:
Horatio, there are more dwarfs and idiots combined in the heavens than can be found in your International Astronomical Union.
Horatio, I think Sarge II is right. I can understand the heartburn some had over Pluto remaining classified as a planet. But I felt the earth move when the IAU demoted it. I mean, how can 10,000 science fiction stories all be wrong? The foundations of my long-gone youth are shaken!

Now we have planets, dwarf planets, and most recenetly plutoids. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot? Seems pretty arrogant to be creatings new classes of objects when we know so little about what's beyond Neptune, and while having only two examples in hand. And for that matter, why don't we have a classification for binary planets, of which the Earth-Luna pair would be the extant example?
That's an excellent point.
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Post by Dark Angel » Sun Jun 15, 2008 10:12 pm

Sparrow wrote:
Horatio, there are more dwarfs and idiots combined in the heavens than can be found in your International Astronomical Union.
Horatio, I think Sarge II is right. I can understand the heartburn some had over Pluto remaining classified as a planet. But I felt the earth move when the IAU demoted it. I mean, how can 10,000 science fiction stories all be wrong? The foundations of my long-gone youth are shaken!

Now we have planets, dwarf planets, and most recenetly plutoids. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot? Seems pretty arrogant to be creatings new classes of objects when we know so little about what's beyond Neptune, and while having only two examples in hand. And for that matter, why don't we have a classification for binary planets, of which the Earth-Luna pair would be the extant example?
Very good point...IMHO it's all a Charlie Foxtrot!
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Post by Sarge_II » Sun Jun 15, 2008 10:50 pm

I have posted on this at the SETI@Home forums, probably in 2006. I do not wish to look for that/those post(s). I will not elaborate much, because someone will probably get upset about it. However, please take a look at the first paragraph in the first link I've provided, since it also refers to evolving definitions like I referred to in my 2006 (?) post(s) at S@H.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Definition_of_planet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_planet

Scientists need operational definitions so that they will be able to communicate with fellow scientists, so that they can draw comparisons and distinctions in a meaningful way.

The astronomical community, as we know, has not finished their debate. Frankly, how we feel about the IAU 2006 decision has nothing to do with whether their decision was right or how the debate will continue to develop. Again, what matters is scientists having a way to meaningfully communicate about similarities and differences.

Sparrow, it is not arrogant to define new classes of objects. Since humans could define things, in our pre-history, we have been defining things. "That's a cat. It is not a dog." So on and so forth. Take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_function and see at the bottom the variety of classes of continuous functions. Then, at the top, the history of the evolution of the definition of a continuous function itself.

BTW, sorry, there's no Horatio posting here. I was free-associating.

[Edit: Sorry, I now see the Wiki on continuous functions does not have a section on history of the definition. But, I don't feel like taking the time to look up links to provide folks.]
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Post by Gavin Shaw » Mon Jun 16, 2008 12:30 am

Don't take it too seriously my posting. I was more joking, but I do think I kind of have a point.

Dwarf planet is not a planet, yet you use the term planet in its description. Perhaps that was some kind of compromise made to those that wanted it to stay as a planet...
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Post by Sparrow » Mon Jun 16, 2008 2:12 am

Since humans could define things, in our pre-history, we have been defining things. "That's a cat. It is not a dog." So on and so forth.
Point taken, Sarge II. Thank you. I think non-scientists like myself, no matter how much in the science camp we may be, will see these issues somewhat differently than, for example, a working planetary astronomer. Except for a few Internet contacts, I know nobody who as any idea what a dwarf planet might be, let alone a plutoid, or who cares about these things in the slightest. I do, however, know what that committee that's desigining the horse looks like, and I understand that, for that committee, coming up with the camel would be a huge breakthrough.

I've known since about 1953 that our solar system has nine planets. When the IAU altered this, they messed with my gestalt. I understand on an intellectual level, but I nevertheless resent them for it. And clearly I'm not alone. And by any measure, they surely do look like the committee that's working on designing the horse. So it's hard not to take a shot at them now and then.

I do think my "binay planet" point is valid, however. In terms of mass ratio, the Earth/Luna system is unique in the solar system. and perhaps unusual across the galaxy. I continue to hope that the IAU will address this issue in the future.
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Post by Dark Angel » Mon Jun 16, 2008 4:25 am

Sarge_II wrote:I have posted on this at the SETI@Home forums, probably in 2006. I do not wish to look for that/those post(s). I will not elaborate much, because someone will probably get upset about it. However, please take a look at the first paragraph in the first link I've provided, since it also refers to evolving definitions like I referred to in my 2006 (?) post(s) at S@H.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Definition_of_planet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_planet

Scientists need operational definitions so that they will be able to communicate with fellow scientists, so that they can draw comparisons and distinctions in a meaningful way.

The astronomical community, as we know, has not finished their debate. Frankly, how we feel about the IAU 2006 decision has nothing to do with whether their decision was right or how the debate will continue to develop. Again, what matters is scientists having a way to meaningfully communicate about similarities and differences.

Sparrow, it is not arrogant to define new classes of objects. Since humans could define things, in our pre-history, we have been defining things. "That's a cat. It is not a dog." So on and so forth. Take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuous_function and see at the bottom the variety of classes of continuous functions. Then, at the top, the history of the evolution of the definition of a continuous function itself.

BTW, sorry, there's no Horatio posting here. I was free-associating.

[Edit: Sorry, I now see the Wiki on continuous functions does not have a section on history of the definition. But, I don't feel like taking the time to look up links to provide folks.]
I would agree with you Sarge on the point that the scientific community needs to be able to communicate via a standard set of definitions as does even my profession however when this was decided they proceeded to announce it with all pompous fanfare to the world that it had been changed...it's one thing to use a term among a community and have it understood by the community it's something entirely different to dictate a change to the world that rewrites historical groundings and flies in direct contradiction to what the scientific community has stated in the past regarding such things. To me it's the act and the way that they did it that is arrogant not the use of the terms in a circle of peers.
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Post by susan » Fri Aug 08, 2008 11:01 pm

Perseids meteor shower over the UK on 12 August. Should be a nice show if weather permits, but a lot of cloud cover at the moment. Hope it shifts.

Approximate number of meteors expected per hour = 75

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Post by Sarge_II » Sat Aug 09, 2008 12:32 am

susan wrote:Perseids meteor shower over the UK on 12 August. Should be a nice show if weather permits, but a lot of cloud cover at the moment. Hope it shifts.

Approximate number of meteors expected per hour = 75
I was able to see a nice show of the Perseids in 1998. I don't recall being able to see to much of it since them. It is August of each year, right?
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Post by susan » Sun Aug 10, 2008 12:38 am

Yes, it occurs on August 12 annually. Unfortunately the weather is bad over here (and cold). It may not be such a good evening for viewing.

There are other meteor showers throughout the year.
I've listed some of them below;

Date----- Name------- Number/hr

January 3----- Quadrantids----- 60
April 22----- Lyrids----- 10
August 12----- Perseids----- 75
November 17----- Leonids----- 10
December 13----- Geminids----- 75

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Post by Labbie » Wed Dec 17, 2008 2:15 pm

Never argue with idiots. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience.

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Post by Labbie » Sat Jan 10, 2009 10:09 pm

Saturday Night Special: Biggest Full Moon of 2009

If skies are clear Saturday, go out at sunset and look for the giant moon rising in the east. It will be the biggest and brightest one of 2009, sure to wow even seasoned observers.

Earth, the moon and the sun are all bound together by gravity, which keeps us going around the sun and keeps the moon going around us as it goes through phases. The moon makes a trip around Earth every 29.5 days.

But the orbit is not a perfect circle. One portion is about 31,000 miles (50,000 km) closer to our planet than the farthest part, so the moon's apparent size in the sky changes. Saturday night (Jan. 10) the moon will be at perigee, the closest point to us on this orbit.

It will appear about 14 percent bigger in our sky and 30 percent brighter than some other full moons during 2009, according to NASA. (A similar setup occurred in December, making that month's full moon the largest of 2008.)

High tides

Tides will be higher, too. Earth's oceans are pulled by the gravity of the moon and the sun. So when the moon is closer, tides are pulled higher. Scientists call these perigean tides, because they occur when the moon is at or near perigee. (The farthest point on the lunar orbit is called apogee.)

This month's full moon is known as the Wolf Moon from Native American folklore. The full moon's of each month are named. January's is also known as the Old Moon and the Snow Moon.

A full moon rises right around sunset, no matter where you are. That's because of the celestial mechanics that produce a full moon: The moon and the sun are on opposite sides of the Earth, so that sunlight hits the full face of the moon and bounces back to our eyes.

At moonrise, the moon will appear even larger than it will later in the night when it's higher in the sky. This is an illusion that scientists can't fully explain. Some think it has to do with our perception of things on the horizon vs. stuff overhead.

Try this trick, though: Using a pencil eraser or similar object held at arm's length, gauge the size of the moon when it's near the horizon and again later when it's higher up and seems smaller. You'll see that when compared to a fixed object, the moon will be the same size in both cases.

More lunacy

If you have other plans for Saturday night, take heart: You can see all this on each night surrounding the full moon, too, because the moon will be nearly full, rising earlier Friday night and later Sunday night.

Interestingly, because of the mechanics of all this, the moon is never truly 100 percent full. For that to happen, all three objects have to be in a perfect line, and when that rare circumstance occurs, there is a total eclipse of the moon.

A departing fact: The moon is moving away as you read this, by about 1.6 inches (4 centimeters) a year. Eventually this drift will force the moon to take 47 days to circle our world.
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Post by Gavin Shaw » Sun Jan 11, 2009 1:49 am

The Brisbane river is having a really high tide today. In some places it is right at the top of its banks.

Will try to look at the moon tonight, but I think the expectation is for cloud again...
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Post by Labbie » Sun Jan 11, 2009 3:10 am

It's pretty spectacular. It's throwing off the sharpest shadows I have ever seen by the moon.
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Post by Labbie » Fri Feb 06, 2009 4:28 am

Never argue with idiots. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience.

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Post by Sarge_II » Fri Feb 06, 2009 8:45 am

Green comets are wack.
What I do know is, Pluto's no planet.
I know planet. And you, sir, are no planet.
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Post by Sarge_II » Fri Feb 06, 2009 3:03 pm

Speaking of astronomy, looks like MW is still down.
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Re: Astronomy

Post by markdilon » Fri Aug 27, 2010 6:28 pm

It is predictions on the matters in the universe and the quite interesting thing to know about the universe. Astronomy is one of the oldest sciences. On the left the effects of prehistoric cultures of astronomy as Egypt and Stonehenge, and ancient civilizations like the Babylonians, Greeks, Chinese and Indians, and the application of systematic observation of the night sky.

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