Ham Radio Operators?

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Redwolf
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Ham Radio Operators?

A little more than two weeks ago (as of this posting) I got my Amateur Radio Operator License. Right now I'm only doing local 2m/70cm on a couple of Boafengs (commonly known as baotatoes or potatofengs), but I have an EchoLink app on my iPhone and there are EchoLink, AllStar, and I think IRLP repeaters in my area. If anyone else out there has a license and would like to chat sometime, hit me up! KM4TBY.

Brandon Pisani
Giric Red Wolf

Booga
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That pretty cool Redwolf. As

That pretty cool Redwolf. As a kid it seemed like everyone had them. Now days its hard to find someone that's into them. Never knew you had to get a License for it though.

Rick

Redwolf
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Oh, we had walkie talkies

Oh, we had walkie talkies when I was a kid. These, though, use (http://www.arrl.org/graphical-frequency-allocations) VHF & UHF frequencies that do require a license to use, and put out a bit more power (a whopping 5 watts!). CB Radio used to require a license, but has been deregulated. Yes, truckers and other still use CBs. I'd like to afford a HF radio system, but that's a ways down the pike. Just the antennas alone...

Booga
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Yep. Had a couple friends

Yep. Had a couple friends parents who were into them a lot. Learned a little, but we were kids. Who wanted to sit around and chat with them about a radio? Wasn't till years later I found out what it really was. Well I should say I knew what it was but to young to really care. lol

Rick

TimeLord04
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I have a friend in Florida

I have a friend in Florida with a Ham License. I just let him know that your able to chat. He may get in contact with you. He's on SETI Team Raccoon Lovers. (Zombu2) I don't know his Ham Radio "Handle" - (is that the right term???).

TimeLord04
Have TARDIS, will travel...

Come along K-9!
Join Calm Chaos

TimeLord04
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OK; Redwolf, Zombu2's Ham ID

OK; Redwolf, Zombu2's Ham ID is KM4DAJ, but he says you'd have to have an "HF" rig to talk to "normal" Hams... But, he says the two of you can chat if you're interested.

TimeLord04
Have TARDIS, will travel...

Come along K-9!
Join Calm Chaos

Redwolf
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Well, I don't know about that

Well, I don't know about that. Then again, the quality of some of the conversations I've been privy to lately... Yeah, I'll look him up. Thanks for the info!

TimeLord04
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Friend in Florida.

I was on Skype with my friend in Florida, yesterday. He said he was able to talk to you, but on his end your signal was weak. Sorry to hear that it didn't go well. I told him to try Echolink. Maybe that will work better for both of you... I hope, though, you at least heard him clearly - I know he's got a more powerful transmitter than yours. He's REALLY into his HAM stuff. I just dream about it all. I knew a guy when I was back in High School that had a setup. I was fascinated with it. I never took the tests, though.

TimeLord04
Have TARDIS, will travel...

Come along K-9!
Join Calm Chaos

Redwolf
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Yeah, we just keep missing

Yeah, we just keep missing each other. I haven't popped through all of the area repeaters, and my house is in a... well, not a dead zone, but a weak zone. I kept EchoLink up on my PC, but had to rush off at some point and we missed again.

Point of note: it's just ham, not HAM. There's no acronym. Although, over on the Amateur Radio subreddit, we did play around via IRC of coming up with "backronym" of something like "hackers, amateurs, makers"...

Getting started on VHF/UHF is relatively cheap. I got two radios and some aftermarket antennas and stuff from Amazon for <$100. They're poorly made Chinese hand-helds, but great for the local scene. Getting a license isn't too difficult, and there are many options for study (like HamStudy and AA9PW's site), and the Laurel ARC's affiliate exams are free. Morse Code has not been a requirement for many years, but a lot of people still learn it. I'm working on it. In the US, the local repeaters and club nets (networks of hams on one repeater or frequency; the regular nets are practice for emergency nets) are mostly on VHF/UHF frequencies, which only require a Technician license (lowest level). I'm saving my pennies to work toward a HF rig (that's the long, high antennas and talking to people in other countries without using EchoLink or AllStar). With a cheap RTL-SDR, an upconverter, and a cheap antenna, you can listen to the world on HF (Shortwave), including commercial shortwave broadcasts and hams trying to talk around the world. I used my SDR and some free software to get the recent ISS slow-scan TV transmissions.

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